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Thread: Destruction and Reconstruction - Richard Taylor

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    Destruction and Reconstruction - Richard Taylor

    Richard Taylor's book, his remembrances of the so-called "Civil War" is considered the finest of all those written by former Confederate generals and soldiers ("Company H"). I'll take it one step further and say it is one of the finest documentaries of that era in our history...period. I have read the book cover to cover 4 times and often refer to it as one would any reference book of history. Published in 1879, the same year as his untimely death, he was but 53, Taylor's book is a commentary of the pivotal period in our nation's history, given some 15 years of post-war hindsight to dig into what really happened and why. It is also important to note that Richard Taylor was HIGHLY respected by all, North and South, and his frequent meetings and their seeking his opinion and guidance on all matters of policy by the likes of presidents Johnson and Grant, and congressional leaders such as the anti-South fire-breathing Thaddeus Stevens, and the sneaky, conniving Salmon Chase speaks volumes of the capacity of Taylor.

    So, it is with that brief back drop I offer some of Taylor's viewpoints on "American politics."

    Since immigration is such a hot topic in 2019, it's interesting to read what some thought of the issue in the mid-19th century. Such as this directly from his writings:

    The vast immigration that poured into the country between the years of 1840 and 1860 had a very important influence on the events of the latter year. The numbers were too great to be absorbed and assimilated by the native population. States in the West were controlled by Germans and Scandinavian voters, and the Irish took possession of seaboard towns. ...the balance of party strength was not much affected by these naturalized voters, the modes of political thought were seriously disturbed, and a tendency was manifested to transfer exciting topics from the domain of argument to that of violence.


    In other words, new immigrant populations brought with them cultural peculiarities that fueled passions in certain issues, long dealt with by the American culture. Kind of a "OMG! not this again!?" According to Taylor, this "movement" proved to be disruptive during the 1860 political campaigns, especially for the White House, caused deep riffs in the Democrat Party, i.e. split the Dem Party over trivial matters, and led to the election of Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln. Historical records bear this out.

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    Re: Destruction and Reconstruction - Richard Taylor

    Like others "in the know" at the time, Richard Taylor alludes to the truths of the politics of "the radicals" attempting to influence the course of events. He makes mention of "globalism" although he does not use that term, what he describes in a paragraph is globalism. Another Confederate general, Patrick Cleburne, an immigrant from Ireland who had experienced the tyranny of the "one world movement" in his home country, addressed his troops on the eve of the Battle of Franklin, in the fall of 1864. Cleburne wrote a letter addressed to "everyone" as he anticipated his own death the next day. In it he says:

    While they [the North] claim to be fighting to keep this nation together and to abolish slavery, that is only a pretense. Their designs are not limited to the events here, but have ramifications that extend beyond these borders.

    It was commonly known among Confederate leaders, both military and civilian politicians, that the "world" was against them. In his book Taylor writes:

    Long had our leaders [politicians] hoped for an intervention from western Europe, but alas the entrenchment of those favoring centralization of power prevented adoption of a policy friendly to our cause.

    In other words, the last thing the "globalists" wanted was the US to divide into two countries. That would be contrary to their goal of combining the world under one government.

    Further, the most radical of the radicals, Thaddeus Stevens, told Taylor in one of their meetings that the Constitution should be shredded as it served to prevent the Federal government from exercising the needed power. Those pesky Bill of Rights, mind you. Stevens was a leader in the American chapter of the "one world order."

    Taylor does not pull punches in his criticism of the South and its people. He mentions the South had created its own monarchy that now ruled all courses of action: King Cotton. He said "we" because he was a Southerner, born in Kentucky, but his family relocated to Louisiana when he was still an infant, and he was as devoted to "the cause" as anyone else, he admits. Still, he told the truth as it stood in 1860 and the years that followed. No one, not even himself, was spared criticism.

    He also took the press to task and the gullible fervor with which people swallowed the lies. One example he mentions were the events of the race riots in Louisiana, from about 1873 to 1875. In one incident, "more negroes were murdered than ever existed in the place," yet the public was not disturbed by the incorrect mathematics. And how this contrived event gave the radicals the excuse to remove duly elected officials at the point of Federal bayonets.

    The more things change...the more they remain the same. Which is why, even when I personally get upset, I remind myself that which we think is so trying and alarming today is really nothing new, and in fact, pales in comparison to what this great nation has already survived in its remarkable history.

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    Re: Destruction and Reconstruction - Richard Taylor

    Good stuff, '80. I appreciate the insight, and reminder, that very little that is happening is "new"

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